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#10 – Me llamo Bictor.

Corporate Spanish Trainer

Post 10 of 365

¡Hola!
Welcome to Spanish Blog 365!

Today is Part II of pronunciation
La pronunciación española, Parte II – las consonantes

Click here to review vowels in Spanish
la Pronunciación – Parte I 

Let’s start today with a Quiz
A Quiz? Yes, a Quiz – you can do it!

A pronunciation quiz to see how well you already pronounce Spanish words.
Depending on what part of the country or world that you live in, you may already be familiar with most of these words.

Say these aloud.
amigo
mesa
señor
jalapeño
Jorge
tortilla
pollo
chile relleno
agua
queso
cerveza
Denver
cinco
hasta luego
mucho

Great job! – ¡Muy buen trabajo!

Consonant sounds in Spanish:

d – slight th (buenos días, ¿De dónde?, distancia)
h – silente (hasta, hola, humor, alcohol)
j – like h in Engish (Jorge, naranja, jicama, hijo)
ll – like the y in English (chile relleno, apellido, llamada, calle)
ñ – like ny in English or the sound of onion (español, compañero, año, ñoquí)
q – que = k, qui=key as in quesoQuito, Ecuador, arquitectura, arqueología

And now, here’s the reference to the title of this Post – Me llamo ‘B’ictor.

In Spanish the ‘V’ sounds like a ‘B’. When it starts a word, it’s very strong – Victor.
When it’s in the middle of a word, it is softer, but still a ‘b’ sound. Vive

Let’s practice.
v – like the b in English  – Victor vive en Denver, – Me voy, – Vámonos

The last letter, the ‘Z’ is usually pronounced like an ‘s’, but it Spain it’s a ‘th’ sound

In Latin America say it like this:
z
– like the s in English (cerveza, zapatos, zumo de toronja)
But when you go to Spain, you’ll hear this:  a ‘th’ sound on the ‘z’ as in plaza, Zoo

Later this week we’ll do the final piece on pronunciation – Parte III.

In the meantime, your…
Action step: Spend some time in the reference section of this Blog.
You’ll find lots of great practice there!

Muchas gracias por acompañarme en el Spanish Blog 365
Hasta mañana,
Carolina

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